“When an Amdavadi tries to become a Mumbaikar”


A little more than 4 months, I graduated from my high school. I was so excited that within few days I will be packing my bags and travel all the way to Mumbai to do what I love.

Leaving my old life was hard. There was a sense of familiarity where I was living. But all of a sudden I was moving to a city, hardly ever visited by me, where I would be living on my own for the first time. But at the same time, there was this different kind of adrenaline rush about moving into the big apple of India.

Okay, so as I was moving 700 km away, I promised each one of them (Family & friends) that I will call or text them regularly. I tell you I am pretty punctual about it.

For the first month, I was living at my brother’s place in South Mumbai. My college is in Goregaon (E) which is probably 26km from the place where I was staying. This gave me a great opportunity to commute like a real Mumbaikar. I used local trains. Every day I would try to catch 7:40 (Borivali slow) local so that I reach on time in college. Though it is early morning but trains would be jam packed. Literally, there were times when u can’t even move from your place. People used to push you out and take you in on the train. It is an amazingly efficient system. Your total energy is conserved. Not everyone used to be social on the train. Less social humans used to isolate themselves in front of a mobile screen with their earphones on. I used to spend 3-4 hours on the train every day. So I had a lot of time to kill. I used to watch movies or talk with random strangers about random things happening in any random industry. Till now my life was smooth as I was at home. Everything was taken care of. From my food to clean clothes, everything was there. Though they never told me but I thought that maybe I was bothering them too much. This was my personal feeling.

So after a month I finally shifted to Goregaon. Now my actual bachelor life started. I am responsible for keeping my house clean, bring groceries, make my bed, clean my toilet, wash my clothes and most importantly cook my food. I took this as a challenge. This would help me to become more independent. For about a month or so I totally enjoyed it. I was like my house is the best and I take care of it more than anyone else out there. But as time passed I became careless. Instead of cooking food I used to order it from outside. Instead of cleaning my clothes every day, I started washing them every week.

Another thing I felt here that time used to fly very quickly. Back in Ahmedabad time was bit slow paced but here, I don’t why it flies away with a swish here. I have been in Mumbai for about 5 months and I still don’t think that I have spent more than 2 months here.

At a point, I miss my parents and friends. Every day, at night, when I lie on my bed this thought haunts my mind. I keep on staring the fan think that if my mother was here than she would have converted this house into a home. She would have taken care of my everyday needs. Sometimes I feel that I should go back for few days so that I can get along with others who are chasing their dreams in this urban jungle.

Now if anyone tells me that leaving your hometown and shifting to a new state is an extraordinary thing to do, I feel that person has some serious guts to leave his cocoon and step out in this concrete city who doesn’t give a damn about your feelings. It’s not that I cannot live alone and take care of myself. I just need some more time to get used to this rapidly growing city.

So idea about leaving your home and move to a new city is an extraordinary thing to do but the reality is that this is an overhyped myth, at least for most of them like me. It pleases you when you are unknown about the reality. But at some point in life, you will understand that this idea was a trap which could suck your talent if you don't fight against it.

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